Medical Arts Building (Oak Park, Illinois)

Medical Arts Building, Oak Park, Illinois from NW 2017.jpg

The Medical Arts Building is an Art Deco office building at 715 Lake Street, Oak Park, Illinois.[1][2] It is a contributing property to the Ridgeland–Oak Park Historic District.[2][3][4][5] At 122 feet, it was the tallest building in Oak Park for several decades after it was built.[6][7][8]

History

The Medical Arts Building was designed by Oak Park architect Roy J. Hotchkiss and was built in 1929 by Harper & Stelzer at an approximate cost of $250,000.[1][2][9][10] Hotchkiss had previously worked as head draftsman for Eben Ezra Roberts.[11] The Medical Arts Building was Hotchkiss's principal contribution to Oak Park's architectural landscape.[11] It was originally owned by Charles B. Scoville and was later owned by the Scoville Trust.[2][3][10][12] In 1976, the building was sold to Dowling and Company.[13] It was later acquired by Jack and Tim Sheehan.[14] The building's terra cotta facade was restored in 2007.[14] Peterson's Pharmacy was a tenant from 1929, when the building opened, until 2014.[15]

References

  1. ^ a b American Institute of Architects Chicago (2014) AIA Guide to Chicago. Third Edition. University of Illinois Press. p. 341. Retrieved October 8, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d Oak Park Historic Preservation Commission (2005). Architectural Survey: Downtown Oak Park and The Avenue Business District. Oak Park, Illinois. p. 9. Retrieved October 8, 2019.
  3. ^ a b "715 Lake St Oak Park, Illinois USA", Historic Architecture Survey Database Managed with RuskinARC. April 15, 2015. Retrieved October 8, 2019.
  4. ^ Bluestone, Daniel M.; Oak Park Landmarks Commission. "Ridgeland–Oak Park Historic District National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form", Oak Park Landmarks Commission. December 8, 1983. p. 5. Retrieved October 8, 2019.
  5. ^ "National Register of Historic Places Inventory - Nomination Form: Ridgeland–Oak Park Historic District" (PDF). National Park Service. November 7, 1983. Retrieved October 8, 2019.
  6. ^ Al-Kodmany, Kheir (2016). New Suburbanism: Sustainable Tall Building Development. Routledge. p. 166. Retrieved October 8, 2019.
  7. ^ Stempniak, Marty. "Oak Park entrepreneur opens tour business hoping to capitalize on two-wheeled people-movers", Wednesday Journal. April 19, 2011. Retrieved October 7, 2019.
  8. ^ Haley, Dan. "Shadows and shade", Wednesday Journal. December 11, 2018. Retrieved October 8, 2019.
  9. ^ Deuchler, Douglas (2003). Oak Park in Vintage Postcards. Arcadia Publishing. Retrieved October 8, 2019.
  10. ^ a b "$341,280 For New Buildings", The Oak Parker. March 8, 1929. p. 15. Retrieved October 8, 2019.
  11. ^ a b Steiner, Frances, "E.E. Roberts: Popularizing the Prairie School." The Prairie School Review. Second Quarter, 1973. pp. 5-24.
  12. ^ Devine, Kay. "Gilmore's site put on market", Oak Park River Forest World. Vol. 9, No. 9. March 30, 1977. p. 1. Retrieved October 8, 2019.
  13. ^ Business briefs", Oak Leaves. September 15, 1976. p. 25. Retrieved October 8, 2019.
  14. ^ a b Magda, Erica. "Medical Arts to get $500K makeover", Wednesday Journal. June 19, 2007. Retrieved October 7, 2019.
  15. ^ "Peterson's Pharmacy to close after 85 years", Wednesday Journal. July 17, 2014. Retrieved October 8, 2019.

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