Jack Borgenicht

Jacob 'Jack' Moses Borgenicht (1911-2005) was an American entrepreneur, land use preservation activist, garment manufacturer, millionaire, restaurant owner, philanthropist and the oldest person to climb Mount Rainier at the age of 81. [1][2]

Biography

He was born Jacob Moses Borgenicht to a Jewish family in Manhattan, New York. He was the youngest of 14 siblings born to prominent garment manufacturers Regina and Louis Borgenicht.[3][4] He spent two years attending New York University.

Career

He dropped out of college during the Great Depression to help the family clothing manufacturing company Borgenicht and Spiro. He formed his own company, Jack Borgenicht Inc., in 1944.[5][6]

Mountain climbing

Starting at the age of 78, Borgenicht and his climbing partner, kinesiology professor Ken Kambis, have climbed Mount Elbert and Mount Rainier with plans to climb Mount Kiliminjaro and Mount Everest.[5]

Marriage and children

Borgenicht was married four times; once to Grace Borgenicht Brandt and then three others. He had ten children including ceramic artist Ruth Borgenicht.

Legacy

On his death, he arranged to make multi-million dollar charitable donations to the College of William and Mary to fund the Foundation for Aging Studies and Exercise Science Research and a Hypoxia/Altitude Physiology Research Facility[7][8]

Five years after his death, the New Jersey Conservation Foundation and its partners, including the Morris County Open Space Trust Fund, bought his 228 acre estate in Long Valley, New Jersey for $2.8 million for open space preservation.[9][10]

Philosophical and/or political views

Borgenicht has stated that The Anatomy of Peace by Emery Reves expresses his philosophy best. Winston Churchill and Yasser Arafat were his role models.[11]

Further reading

References

  1. ^ "Paid Notice: Deaths BORGENICHT, JACOB MOSES JACK". The New York Times. 2005-08-27. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  2. ^ "81-Year-Old Man Scales Mt. Rainier". Los Angeles Times. 1992-10-25. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  3. ^ Gladwell, Malcolm (2008). Outliers: The Story of Success. New York - Boston - London: Little, Brown and Company. pp. Chapter 5. ISBN 978-0316017923.
  4. ^ "Louis Borgenicht: How to Do Meaningful Work that Matters". Dean Yeong. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  5. ^ a b Press, ALISON FREEHLING Daily. "HIGH PROFILE: JACK BORGENICHT". dailypress.com. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  6. ^ "Bloomberg - Are you a robot?". www.bloomberg.com. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  7. ^ "TFASESR Jack Borgenicht Biography". tfasesr.com. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  8. ^ "Jack Borgenicht Hypoxia/Altitude Physiology Research Facility | William & Mary". www.wm.edu. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  9. ^ Goldberg, Dan (2010-12-08). "N.J. to purchase, preserve millionaire's Long Valley land as open space". nj.com. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  10. ^ "Morris Helps Preserve 228 Wooded Acres in Long Valley". Morris County, NJ. 2010-12-07. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  11. ^ Press, ALISON FREEHLING Daily. "HIGH PROFILE: JACK BORGENICHT". dailypress.com. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  12. ^ "The Happiest Man". desolatte. 2012-06-04. Retrieved 2019-09-03.

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